Understanding the $1 in Java class file names: Explained

├Źndice
  1. Introduction:
  2. The Explanation:
  3. Conclusion:

Introduction:

Java is a popular programming language that is used to develop a wide range of applications including web, desktop, and mobile applications. When working with Java, you may come across class files that have names with a dollar sign followed by a number. This can be confusing for beginners, but it is actually a simple naming convention that has a specific purpose. In this article, we will explain what the $1 in Java class file names means.

The Explanation:

In Java, when you declare a nested class within another class, the compiler generates a class file with a name that includes the dollar sign and a number. The number indicates the order in which the nested class was declared within the outer class. For example, if you declare two nested classes within an outer class, the first nested class will have a name that ends with $1, and the second nested class will have a name that ends with $2.

Here's an example to illustrate this:


public class OuterClass {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      InnerClass1 obj1 = new InnerClass1();
      InnerClass2 obj2 = new InnerClass2();
      obj1.print();
      obj2.display();
   }
   static class InnerClass1 {
      void print() {
         System.out.println("This is InnerClass1");
      }
   }
   static class InnerClass2 {
      void display() {
         System.out.println("This is InnerClass2");
      }
   }
}

In this example, the compiler will generate two class files - OuterClass.class and OuterClass$1.class. The OuterClass$1.class file contains the bytecode for InnerClass1, which was declared first in the outer class.

Conclusion:

In summary, the $1 in Java class file names indicates nested classes within an outer class, and the number following the dollar sign indicates the order in which the nested class was declared within the outer class. This naming convention is used by the Java compiler to generate unique names for each class file. Understanding this convention can help you navigate and work with Java class files more effectively.

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